About your Search

20121201
20121231
STATION
CNBC 6
CSPAN 5
CSPAN2 5
CNNW 4
MSNBCW 2
KGO (ABC) 1
KPIX (CBS) 1
WJLA (ABC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 29
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)
between house speaker boehner and president obama. with stephen moore of the "wall street journal" and later the author of "columbine" and what we have learned from that tragedy and how it applies to the shooting in connecticut. >> i called on congress today to act immediately on what is appropriate to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the headline in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation
:15 p.m., singer and song writer, james taylor. host: stephen dinan is politics editor with the washington times and he is here to talk to us about the fiscal cliff. what's next? so let's get to it. on friday you had the lead story with the headline boehner's plan fails to win over g.o.p. the collapse is a serious blow to house speaker john boehner who hoped to gain leverage in his discussion with president obama and signals conservative republicans are unwilling to stomach any rise in tax rates even on those making more than $1 million which was mr. boehner's plan. so walk us through what happened on friday. how did we get there? and it seems like the speaker of the house didn't see this coming, and a lot of folks in washington want to know why not? guest: we begin the week with the speaker of the house saying negotiations between he and president obama had stalled. they were stuck on their -- i guess i would say maybe not their final offers but current offers. boehner said he would raise taxes on those making a million a year or more and get all told $1 trillion in ta
've got to get this done. >> "outfront" tonight, daniel altman at nyu stern school of business, stephen, let me start with you. do you share the president's mod els optimism? >> you know, my opinion of this changes every couple of hours, john. because there's these negotiations going on. and this morning i felt pretty positive the president was flying back from his hawaii vacation, republicans seemed to be in the mood to try to get this done, and they could bridge this gap. but you know, my conversations with some of the republican leaders is that not much was accomplished today. and as you know, john, the clock is ticking. what are we, 72 hours away from going over that cliff? i'm not sure this is going to get resolved right new. looks like we may go into january without a deal. >> stephen moore saying we're going off the cliff. we've got new details on the plan, the president's scaled-down proposal. here's what's on the table. extend the current tax rates for 98% of americans, incomes up to $250,000. extend unemployment benefits, that's an important point. extending the alternative mi
move the markets tomorrow. kimberly foss. stephen rosen. and rich peterson. good to see you all. thank you for joining us. kimberly, you've got 30 seconds on the clock. what do you look for tomorrow? >> hey, maria. we're looking for the housing billing index tomorrow to be going up. we think it's going to be positive. obviously reflects the sentiment of the average investor and their financial candidaondition. we're looking at the fiscal cliff and what's happening with the backdrop of boehner. a lot of people are focused on 401(k). finally, the consumer sentiment number on friday. boomers are big part of that. they're a big part of my practice. if they're spending, that means the economy is growing. good thing for the market altogether. >> stephen, you're up. 30 seconds on the clock. what do you want to look at to move our money tomorrow? >> yeah, sure. we're focusing on the euro dollar right now. in the e byty, it's kind of hard to see the forest through the year s trees. i think a lot of that has been supported by the weak dollar. the currency markets are definitery much deeper. i th
. >> stephen moore saying we're going off the cliff. we've got new details on the plan, the president's scaled-down proposal. here's what's on the table. extend the current tax rates for 98% of americans, incomes up to $250,000. extend unemployment benefits, that's an important point. not being talked about enough. extending the alternative minimum tax patch. prevents cuts in payments to doctors who treatment medicare payments. -- patients. would this scaled-down proposal save us from economic disaster? >> we've done a tremendous amount of damage to ourselves, embarrassing ourselves around the world. we're assuring investors we're as risky as standard & poor's thought we were when they reduced our credit rating. it would be great if we could avoid sharp credit risks. restoring the unemployment insurance benefits is really important because you have millions of people who are depending on this for income. and they're going to spend that money if you give it to them and that's what the economy needs. >> absolutely right. >> wait, hold on. let me say something. that outlines that deal that you ju
, next. stephen ohlemacher will join us, followed by roundtable discussion. first news update from c-span radio. >> its data clock 33 eastern. defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan today. in remarks to about 100 u.s. service members inside an aircraft hangar at a desert base, he thanked them for their service and emphasized that the u.s. is winding down its involvement in the war. he also said that president obama will decide in the next few weeks how many u.s. troops will stay in afghanistan after the combat mission ends in december of 2014. there are currently 56,000 u.s. troops there. north koreans dancing in the streets of their capital today after the regime successfully fired a long-range rockets, defying international warnings. gallants is likely to bring fresh sanctions and other punishment from the u.s. and its allies, which were quick to condemn its asked a test a technology for a missile that could attack the u.s. mainland. p'yongyang says it was merely a peaceful efforts to put a satellite into orbit. national security council spokesman is calling the launch "a
. what did you hear? >> i heard bang, bang, bang, bang. >> reporter: stephen forsythe iled in the food court. shopper cindy yuille was there, e o. a 15-year-old was seriously wounded. the gunman knew none of his victims. >> i think we all need to be very thankful that this incident wasn't much worse. >> reporter: the gunman was armed with an ar-15 semiautomatic rifle and carry the several magazines of ammunition. >> it appeared the suspect's rifle did jam while he was attacking individuals in the arin court. uchreporter: the mall had incitly run a drill preparing shojust such an incident. stores gathered shoppers and incked their doors. allice arrived at the mall within two minutes of the first 911 call and brought thousands out of the mall ordering them all to keep their hands up. witnesses say 22-year-old jacob roberts was wearing a hockey mask and yelled, "i am the hooter," before he ran down a back hall and turned the gun on himself. roberts has no police record, on h but his mother had seen his life going wrong for years. on her myspace web page, she complained of his drug use and
wanted to do. one of the historians who studied, i think it was -- stephen, said if jefferson hadn't decided to make it rather reckless investment of $30,000 in an outcome he probably would've been able to ride out the financial storms of the early 19th century. and another analysis of the financial records show that jefferson, a slaves actually were very productive farmers. and that in one of the first decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson lost very little money on his farming operation. and so, the slaves were really holding their phones when commodity prices were plunging, and so, i mean and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and he needed someone to cosign a $20,000 note and he talked jefferson into it and then six months later he went bankrupt. that's when the letters from monticello grill begin to get gloomy. -- really begin to get gloomy. >> i want to follow up -- >> we have a circulating microphone. >> all right. well, i w
to fight for the war before it started, he was repeatedly writing letters to stephen douglas. even though douglas was a democrat. and he already had a lot of military experience. he had bought in the black hawk war. and he actually was in charge of the mormons and state of illinois. he was a big military guy, a political guy, and he really wanted to buy mexico. he wrote letters to newspapers saying that this is our possible opportunity to gain california for the united states. and i will be the front of that movement. and in fact, he was. now, pardon is excited about the possibility of taking a lot of mexican territory and manifest destiny. when he gets to mexico, his views change pretty quickly and dramatically. when he gets to mexico, he writes about potential silver mines. and he says that the silver mines here are supposed to be the richest and mexico. and were only abandoned why the ignorance of the mexicans. and he said it would only require a little skill to make these valuable. but the longer he stayed there, the longer you like it. in december of 1846, just a few months after he
into the last shopping weekend before christmas, and stephen bebis is the ceo of brookstone and joins us now on how the holiday season has been shaping up. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> before we get into the holiday season, i need to admit something. i am the guy who sits in those chairs in the airport, you know how you have them in your -- in your store? >> yeah. >> and the massage chairs. and i wonder, do you sell those chairs? i know they're for sale. but how many of those chairs do you sell in a given year? >> we actually sell thousands of those chairs. it's one of our strongest items in our stores. our sales are up over 20% in shares this year alone. >> but you were mad when it just stopped and you were like, this is a mis -- i thought there was more. >> no. i get mad when the brookstone guy comes over and says you've been sitting in that chair for probably too long. and i haven't bought anything yet. >> well, we like you trying the chairs. we like to demonstrate those chairs. because once you sit in a brookstone chair, you're going to want one. they're fantastic. >> for not
. the favorite among south carolinians would be comedian stephen colbert. the south carolina native gets 20% of the vote there. you see it. u.s. congressman tim scott gets 15% and 14% favor u.s. congressman trey gowdy. another 11% would pick jenny sanford, the ex-wife of mark sanford. jenny sanford, tim scott, and goudy are all on hailey's short list. colbert is not. we'll be right back. [ scratching ] you're not using too much are you, hon? ♪ nope. [ female announcer ] charmin ultra soft is so soft you'll have to remind your family they can use less. charmin ultra soft is made with extra cushions that are soft and more absorbent. plus you can use four times less versus the leading value brand. don't worry, there's plenty left for you dad. we all go. why not enjoy the go with charmin ultra soft? ♪ [ male announcer ] this is karen and jeremiah. they don't know it yet, but they're gonna fall in love, get married, have a couple of kids, [ children laughing ] move to the country, and live a long, happy life together where they almost never fight about money. [ dog barks ] because right afte
. a merry cliffmas from stephen colbert. >> everywhere you go you could see the twinkle in children's eyes because in just a couple weeks the fiscal cliff is coming to town. merry cliffmas. if the parties here cannot agree to a budget deal by january 1st, automatic spending cuts will kick in and plunge america into a second recession. and things are not looking too good. >> democrats and republicans are blaming each other for the negotiations. >> who's going to blink first? >> who's going to blink first? >> the white house is daring republicans to blink. >> obama is daring republicans literally to blink. the joke's on him because i know some republicans who have had their eyelids surgically removed. >> also what caused former indiana senate candidate richard mourdock at first the likely winner in that race to end up losing to joe donnelly? you might well point to this moment from a mourdock/donnelly debate. >> i struggled with it myself for a long time but realized life is a gift from god. even when life begins in the horrible situation of rape it is something god intended to happen. >> mo
is with bell point alternatives and on the fundamental side of the story stephen weiss is with short hills capital. good to see you. jeff, make the case. you're looking at the charts. how do you like ups versus fedex? >> maria, i think you have to look at the longer-term chart, and if you look at the ten-year period, the true leader is federal express. it's up 76% versus the 24% that ups is. that's where you find the leaders. now let's take a closer look and look at the micro view of this chart, and we go to the year to date chart, and if you see a year to date, trading within a range, between 84 and 94, and what's going tonight difference. what's going tonight difference to push this to go higher, the catalyst, right. we wanted to see it go above $94 a share and the catalyst is going tonight international markets. we've seen some clarity over there, and you've seen a really -- fedex's international numbers have to increase, and that's the catalyst right there. >> jeff, they are both international. it depends on where you want to play. i like ups better because it's got a 3% yield versus a
, morgan lander and stephen nicholas is with us, ed moy and rick lake was with us earlier. chad morgan lander, what do you do? investors are watching all of this, they want some direction and they want to get ready for 2030 and the nonsense continues in washington. >> well, the market is going to get sloppy over the next two weeks until they get a resolution, and you should fully expect that they will get a resolution, and it will be just a short-term resolution. once you get, that the market will then snap back, so we're expecting between a 5% and 7% correction within the market until that time comes, but do you want to layer in risk. you want to be buying good quality companies at this point in time as the market comes into, because that market will snap back, and you will see a modicum of economic growth going further out into the spring. >> and i can see that apple is one of the ones that you like there in terms of snapping up beaten down stocks. you see 20% upside. ed, i want to get to you because i was reading through your bio and you worked at the white house for almost six year
an application to go public in 2009, with drawing in 2011. cerberus's's ceo stephen feinberg has a personal link to the town where the children were shot to death. his father lives in a retirement community there. comments on the sale have not been returned. >> so should big institutions like private equity firms, pensions step up pressure on weapons makers or stop funding them all together. "fortune" magazine senior editor first broke the money behind the newtown massacre story. dan, let's talk a little bit about this. how do you react to the idea cerberus is now, in light of this, going to sell the company they so meticulously put together. it's not as though people didn't know that they were in the weapons business here all along. now they are saying we want to be out of it because we don't want to be part of the debate or they think the heat on them is going to become too great. >> i think it's the heat not part of the debate. they owned freedom group when freedom group had paid lobbyists in d.c. working on gun issues. that's not directly cerberus but clearly that makes them part of the poli
showed our viewers this last week, stephen, as you recall. here is north korea. here is coast of japan. here off to the east, let me change the color here so we can see it a bit better. here is japan. here is the coast of alaska. hawaii would be over in this area. a range of 5 to 6,000 kilometers. that is about 3600 miles. that still does not reach hawaii. it would however reach the western coast of alaska because these are the outer bands of range we do believe they're trying to accomplish. have they been able to get close, even to this area here when you see some of the remnants drop here in the philippines, steve? >> i think what we have to say is this is significant forward leap for them well beyond what previous tests accomplished. i think it would be a mistake on our part to assume that future leaps forward are in the distant future only. they seem to aggressively pursued a vansment here. kim jong-un, the new young leader, succeeded where his father has failed. it is significant propaganda today victory. they're moving forward as one of the most sanctioned countries. bill: even w
with where we just went. >> i love -- i love stephen a. smith. i'm uncomfortable where you just went. our documentary, "black in america," what it was all about. rg3 doesn't fit into parker's sense of what real blackness is. >> like a stereotype. people advocating against stereotypes, stereotyping themselves their own people. >> it's so -- it's so offensive on so many levels. you lined up three white guys to talk about this thing, this term cornball brother, and i tooked an informal poll, and all my black friends. have you ever heard the term, the answer is unanimously by the way no. it turned robert griffin iii, any sense of individuality, and he wants to be defined by who i am, which is a great afrifricki quarterback. >> he feels like he's dodging the question. are you -- what is the role of race in being this great quarterback? right? and for people of color, it's often a challenge. he wants to say i don't want to be defined by being the black quarterback, but at the same time i want to represent all of the black people who look at me as a great quarterback. mr. parker took some great
that is needed. ambassador stephens was a proud californian. -- stevens was a proud californian. i will get to my question. i guess i will ask it straight out -- do you plan in the next budget to request funding levels that are necessary for protecting all of our facilities? >> the answer to that is yes, senator. i am aware that we are under constraints. i remind the committee that for everything we do at the state department, that includes protecting overt 275 locations around the world, the assistance we provide including to israel, everything we do at the state department is less than 1% of our federal budget. >> my question is, are you going to submit to us the plan and the money request do believe you need and paying attention to fiscal constraints? will that be what you truly believe? because i hope so. you cannot count on us to know what the needs are. >> there is no question. we have been ordered to come to congress and the med the 2013 budget requests -- and amend the 2013 budget requests. to add money for our construction costs and to increase diplomatic security for about 5%. we are in
the america's financial future. here is stephen ohlemacher. thank you for being here. how many people in america receive social security? >> a little bit more than 56 million people get social security. the average benefit is a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it is like $13,000, $14,000 a year. >> we're talking about retirees but also the disabled. >> yes, fairly wide group of people get social security benefits, retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. it is a fairly big social safety net of people who get social security benefits. >> as you mentioned about 56 million the retirees received a $1,2 a month. there is also the s.s.i. about $500 a month. how does social security get financed? >> it has been a self funded program. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. you make more than that then any money you make over that is not taxed for social security. it is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers share has been reduced. that has saved, by the way, if you
. with millions of americans unemployed this simply makes no sense. stephen moore, senior writer for "the wall street journal." how are you doing, steve? good morning. >> hi, bill. bill: they're saying 43,000 jobs because of this. what, a latex glove gets taxed? i thought it was just like on mri machines and big items like that? >> actually, no. thank you for doing this segment because a lot of americans don't realize when the president calls for all the new taxes in the fiscal cliff negotiation, mr. president we already have a big tax increase that will hit on january 2nd. that of course is the obamacare taxes. you mentioned one of them, the tax on medical devices and medical equipment, bill, which i agree with, congressman price. that will reduce innovation and will reduce the kind of invention and new products we need to keep people healthier. in addition to that, bill, don't forget there is something called 3.8% investment tax surcharge in the obamacare bill that starts in january. one of the things that the president says is a little misleading i will only raise tax rates back where they
're not in the union. stephen moore, "wall street journal." who would be next? >> there are a number of states neighbors to michigan really looking at this legislation. i'll name a few to you, bill. pennsylvania, ohio, west virgina, states like that are competing against southern states. remember a lot of jobs and a lot of manufacturing has moved from the midwest, the kind of rust belt of america to the south in part because those southern states are right-to-work. can i mention one other thing if i could, bill, about this issue that is important? bill: sure. >> there is so much misinformation what it means to be a right-to-work state. i want your viewers to know this, if you're a right-to-work state it does not ban unions, bill. simply means that workers who work for a unionized company have the right as an individual to join the union or not. it does not ban unions. bill: to be more specific, if you're not a member of a union, in michigan you're required to pay union dues. >> that is exactly right. bill: under this law you're no longer required to pay dues for something you're not gets servi
out his -- my friend gio gonzalez beating out stephen strasburg for the cy young award. >>> all right. when we return we honor a man president obama called an american original plus with the cliff still looming, we'll ask our star financial panel the pressing question, is your money safe? we'll be right back. thank you very much. let's give thanks - for an idea. a grand idea called america. the idea that if you work hard, if you have a dream, if you work with your neighbors... you can do most anything. this led to other ideas like liberty and rock 'n' roll. to free markets, free enterprise, and free refills. it put a man on the moon and a phone in your pocket. our country's gone through a lot over the centuries and a half. but this idea isn't fragile. when times get tough, it rallies us as one. every day, more people believe in the american idea and when they do, the dream comes true. we're grateful to be a part of it. that retiring some day is even an option for sean and me. how'd you get comfortable enough to know you could really do it? well, planning, of course. and we got a lot o
.a. and j.d. from yale and serves as an editor for the yale law's journal. after clerking for stephen breyer when he was judge of the u.s. court of appeals for the first circuit professor amar joined the faculty of yale in 1985. professor amar is a coeditor of the leading constitutional law casebook, decision-decision- making and is th author of several other books including the constitution and criminal procedure, the bill of rights creation and reconstruction, america's constitution a biography and most recently america's unwritten constitution, the president's and decibels we live by. the honorable clarence thomas has served as an associate justice of the supreme court of the united states for nearly 21 years. he attended conceptual cemetery and received an a.b. from the college of the holy cross and his j.d. from yale law school. he served as an assistant attorney general of missouri from 1974 to 1977, an attorney with the monsanto company from 77 to 79 and legislative assistant to senator john danforth from 1979 to 1981. from 1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil right
the weekend. this is in stephens pass, washington. san francisco is still working out flight delays caused by wind-driven rain. you can see what it did to northern california as heavy surf pounded the shoreline. we'll bring in alexadrra steele. even a tornado threat you're talking about. that's rare. what are we watching? >> it is rare, suzanne. i want to show you this map. it's rare to have an isolated tornd or two, but a severe weather outbreak is the xpt for her tomorrow is more rare. here's a look. tomorrow, christmas morning, i'm going to delineate the time so you can see who will see what and when. from houston to new orleans, tomorrow morning your severe weather outbreak threat. winds 60 to 80 miles per hour, and very serious tornados and large, damaging hale. it moving in the afternoon and picks up into western florida. from the afternoon into the evening, atlanta to birmingham. both the severe side tomorrow and a snowy side tomorrow, which is rare as well. in florida and georgia the last time we had christmas day tornadoes was in 2006, and there were six. before that in 1969, and
parts and do you have to do your homework, we can't do it for you. >> stephen, good to see you. >> thank you. >>> a winter storm is dumping snow, ice and lots of travel problem notice northeast ths in week. >>> and which retailers were the winners this holiday season and which ones did come up short? the opening sbael little less than four minutes away. re a bus. omnipotent of opportunity. you know how to mix business... with business. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle. and go. you can even take a full-size or above. and still pay the mid-size price. i could get used to this. [ male announcer ] yes, you could business pro. yes, you could. go national. go like a pro. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't know it yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work
's financial future is stephen joining us from the associated press where he is a reporter. thank you for being here. how many people in america received social security and how much do they get? >> 56 million people get social security and the average benefit is a little over 12,000, a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe 13, $14,000 a year. >> we are talking about retirees come also the disabled. >> there are actually a fairly wide group of people that social security benefits, retired workers, espouses, children, disabled workers, widows it is actually a fairly big social safety net of people who get the social security benefits. >> you mentioned 56 million beneficiaries those retirees receive $1,200 on average. the benefits for disabled, $1,100 on average. also the benefit supplemental security income about $500 a month. how does it get paid for? how does the social security debt-financed? >> it's been a self funded program since its inception and it is funded by the payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. you make more than that any money you make is it is part of
Search Results 0 to 28 of about 29 (some duplicates have been removed)